Four ways to turn a logo into a sign with waterjet cutting

In the previous post, we took a brief overview of how signs are made using waterjet cutting. In this post, we’ll take a look at four different ways you can make a sign out of a logo.

Below is an example logo for “thegymnasium”.

The original logo to be turned into a sign

The original logo to be turned into a sign

Below you will see renderings of two variations with the logo as positive space, and two variations with the logo as negative space.

A rendering of the sign with the logo as negative space. Note that the centers of the letters "e", "g" and "a" are disconnected parts and must be mounted separately.

A rendering of the sign with the logo as negative space. Note that the centers of the letters “e”, “g” and “a” are disconnected parts and must be mounted separately.

 A sign with the logo as negative space. In this design, the centers of the letters "e', "g" and "a" have been bridged making mounting and alignment easier, but producing a logo that is less faithful to the original.

A sign with the logo as negative space. In this design, the centers of the letters “e’, “g” and “a” have been bridged making mounting and alignment easier, but producing a logo that is less faithful to the original.

 

The logo with the letters as positive space in the sign. In this variation, the letters have been bridged with a baseline. Note also the bridge connecting the dot above the "i". Since it is one piece, it is relatively easy to install.

The logo with the letters as positive space in the sign. In this variation, the letters have been bridged with a baseline. Note also the bridge connecting the dot above the “i”. Since it is one piece, it is relatively easy to install.

The logo as a sign in positive space with separate pieces for each letter. This would be the most accurate rendition of the logo when installed on a wall or other background of contrasting color. However, it is the most difficult configuration to install, as each letter must be aligned and mounted separately.

The logo as a sign in positive space with separate pieces for each letter. This would be the most accurate rendition of the logo when installed on a wall or other background of contrasting color. However, it is the most difficult configuration to install, as each letter must be aligned and mounted separately.

 

 

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One thought on “Four ways to turn a logo into a sign with waterjet cutting

  1. Pingback: Simplify lettering and signs by using the right font | Simon Arthur's Blog

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